Short-lived wedding happiness for couples with young couples

A new study confirms that cannabinoids, which are a class of active chemicals in cannabis, can successfully kill leukemia cells. They also find that the combination of chemicals and the order in which they are given is important. The findings will, no doubt, open the door to more effective treatments.

Cannabinoids, also known as phytocannabinoids, act as cannabinoid receptors in the brain. The most well known of these chemicals, and one of the most psychoactive, is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

To date, there have been more than 100 cannabinoids identified, all with different properties and chemical profiles.

And, over recent years, the potential anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids have come into focus.

Laboratory and animal studies have demonstrated that certain cannabinoids inhibit tumor growthby promoting cell death, reducing cell growth, and blocking the development of blood vessels that supply the tumor.

For instance, cannabinoid delta-9-THC can damage or kill liver cancer cells. Similarly, cannabidiol is effective against estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancer cells, without damaging healthy tissue.

Cannabinoids and leukemia

A number of cannabinoids have also been shown to successfully fight leukemia cells. Leukemia is a cancer of bone marrow and other blood-forming organs.

Earlier research found that some of these

Marital bliss short-lived for spouses with younger partners

There are many factors that can put strain on a marriage – money worries, work stress, the demands of a new baby, to name a few. A new study finds that a large age gap between partners may also take its toll.

Researchers found that while both men and women initially report greater marital satisfaction with a significantly younger spouse, this satisfaction may soon dwindle.

Study authors Wang-Sheng Lee, of the Department of Economics at Deakin University in Australia, and Terra McKinnish, of the Department of Economics at the University of Colorado in Denver, recently published their results in the Journal of Population Economics.

As per a 2013 report from the United States Census Bureau, around 10 percent of heterosexual couples and 21 percent of same-sex couples in the U.S. have a partner who is at least 10 years older.

Talking to Medical News Today, Lee said that there has been little research conducted on how large age gaps between married couples influence marital satisfaction.

He said, “When we found a longitudinal data set that allowed us to examine the evolution of marital satisfaction

Scientists may have found a way to stop cancer from metastasizing

Metastasis is the main cause of death in cancer, and current treatments against it are ineffective. But new research may have found a way to slow down, and perhaps even halt, the spread of cancer cells.

Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads throughout the body. During this process, cancer cells may either invade nearby healthy tissue, penetrate the walls of lymph nodes, or enter the surrounding blood vessels.

But new research may have found a way to control metastasis by inhibiting the migration of cancer cells. Stopping the cells from migrating is key in stopping metastasis.

What enables cancer cells to migrate is a set of protrusions that help them to move. The team of researchers – led by Mostafa El-Sayed, Julius Brown Chair and Regents Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech’s School in Atlanta, GA – managed to successfully cut off these protrusions using a special technique.

The findings were published in the journal PNAS.

Breaking cancer cells’ ‘legs’

The long, thin protrusions that help cancer cells to move are called filopodia. They are an extension of a set of “broad, sheet-like” fibers called lamellipodia, which can be

Natural cannabinoid found to play key role in anxiety

Stress-related mood and anxiety disorders affect millions of people in the United States. A new study examines the neurobiology behind these illnesses and finds that controlling a molecule that activates cannabinoid receptors can reduce the symptoms of anxiety.

More than 40 million U.S. adults (or 18 percent of the entire population) live with anxietydisorders, including clinical depression, panic disorders, phobias, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Generalized anxiety disorder affects almost 7 million of these adults, and another 7.7 million are estimated to be affected by PTSD.

Anxiety is usually caused by a variety of factors, which can include genes, family history, personal circumstances, and life events, as well as chemical imbalances in the brain.

A new study – published in the journal Nature Communications – investigates these mental disorders from a neurobiological perspective. Specifically, by using a mouse model, researchers from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, examined the brain’s adaptability to stress and found a naturally occurring chemical that may play a key role in the development of PTSD and depression.

The corresponding author of the study is Dr. Sachin Patel, director of the Division of Addiction Psychiatry and James G. Blakemore Professor of Psychiatry at Vanderbilt University.

Studying the link between endocannabinoids and

Why does hair turn gray?

As you look in the mirror in the morning, you see that inevitable fate has struck: your first gray hair! Whether you are in your 20s or your 50s, gray hair catches up with all of us eventually.

During hair growth, melanocytes make pigment and pass it to hair progenitor cells at the base of the hair follicle. These cells, in turn, transform into the various components of the growing hair.

When our hair grows, pigments are continuously being incorporated, which results in our unique hair color. The cells responsible for this process are the pigment-producing melanocytes at the base of the hair follicle.

In normal hair growth, the follicle produces hair at a rate of around 1 centimeter per month for several years.

But all the cells in our body become increasingly damaged during our lifetime, and these melanocytes are eventually lost. When all the melanocytes are lost in a particular hair follicle, the next hair that grows will be gray or white.

The biology of hair growth is rather complex, with a multitude of specialized cells involved in hair follicle structure and function. Scientists continue to unravel the process of human hair growth and pigmentation.

What

Health benefits of sex

Type “sexual health” into a search engine, and it is likely that you will be bombarded with pages of articles covering anything and everything, from sexual norms and advice on relationships, birth control, and pregnancy, to information about STDs and how to avoid them. What is less often discussed, however, is the abundant physical and psychological health benefits of sex. We have put together a list of the top health benefits of sex, as backed up by science.

In exploring just how sex affects the mind and body, the list of potential benefits appears to be endless.

Aside from reproduction, pleasure, and intimacy, sex seems to have a positive impact on many life areas, including work, physical and cognitive performance, marriage, and happiness into our senior years. Sex may also have a positive effect on certain organs and conditions, as well as a preventive effect on some diseases.

For example, a recent study published in the Journal of Management found that maintaining a healthy sex life at home might boost job satisfaction and engagement at work.

Sex may also play a fundamental role in preserving a happy marriage, according to researchpublished in Psychological Science. Partners are suggested to experience a sexual “afterglow”

Vitamin D guidelines can be changed

A new study finds that, contrary to popular belief, vitamin D-2 and D-3 do not have equal nutritional value. With vitamin D deficiency on the rise, the authors call for a rethink of official guidelines.

Vitamin D is a vital nutrient, helping the gut to absorb calcium while keeping calcium and phosphate at the right concentrations to support healthy bone growth and maintenance. Without adequate levels in the body, bones can become brittle and misshapen.

Low vitamin D levels have also been linked with a range of other conditions, including cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Vitamin D is not naturally present in many foods. Instead, the bulk of our requirement is synthesized in the skin after exposure to ultraviolet light from the sun.

Despite the importance of vitamin D, many people in the United States do not have sufficient levels in their bodies. For example, one study found that overall, more than 40 percent of the U.S. population were vitamin D deficient. So much so, that some authors have referred to vitamin D deficiency as a pandemic.

Furthermore, in one study published in 2009, only 3 percent of black people in their sample of thousands of U.S. individuals had the recommended vitamin D levels, representing a decrease of 9

A boy or a girl? Baby’s sex may influence mother’s immunity

Does the baby’s sex influence the mother’s immune system? A new study investigates the link between fetal sex and the mother’s immune response to illness.
[woman has an ultrasound]
New research suggests that being pregnant with a girl may affect how the mother’s body responds to illness.

A team of researchers from Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center set out to examine whether or not there is a connection between the sex of the baby and the mother’s immunity.

The team was led by Amanda Mitchell, a postdoctoral researcher in the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research at Wexner.

The research was triggered by both anecdotal evidence and scientific studies (referenced by the authors) that suggest that the sex of the fetus influences several physiological responses in the mother. Glycemic control, blood pressure, and cortisol levels have all been shown to differ according to the sex of the fetus.

In the new study, Mitchell and team examined 80 women in the early, middle, and late stages of their pregnancies. Of these future mothers, 46 were pregnant with males and 34 with females. Researchers exposed their immune cells to bacteria to see whether

Baldness: How close are we to a cure?

Baldness is an accepted part of the aging process for some, and a source of distress for others. Hair loss affects millions of men and women, yet despite decades of research, a cure is still not available. Just how close are we to finding a magic bullet for baldness? Medical News Today take a look at the evidence.

Androgenetic alopecia – which is more commonly known as male pattern baldness and female pattern baldness – is the most common type of hair loss, affecting around 30 million women and 50 million men across the United States.

In men, hair loss begins above both temples and recedes over time to form an “M” shape. Hair also tends to thin at the crown and may progress to partial or complete baldness. In women, the hairline does not recede and rarely results in total baldness, but the hair does usually become thinner all over the head.

Male pattern baldness is hereditary and may be linked to male sex hormones. Male hair loss can start as early as during adolescence. It affects two thirds of men by age 35, and around 85 percent of men by the age of 50.

The causes of female pattern baldness are unclear. However, hair

Causes of baldness, gray hair identified

A study of a rare genetic disease may have yielded a cure for hair graying and baldness, after researchers unintentionally discovered the mechanisms that give rise to the conditions.

Study co-author Dr. Lu Le, of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Texas Southwestern in Dallas, and colleagues set out to investigate a disorder called neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a genetic condition whereby tumors grow on nerves.

The aim of the study was to discover the mechanisms behind tumor growth in NF1. Instead, the researchers identified the processes responsible for hair loss and graying, a discovery that could lead to new treatments for the conditions.

The researchers recently reported their findings in the journal Genes and Development.

According to the American Hair Loss Association, by the age of 35, around two thirds of men in the United States will experience some degree of hair loss, and of all those with the condition in the U.S., 40 percent are women.

When it comes to hair graying, a 2012 study found that around 6 to 23 percent of adults across the globe can expect to have at least 50 percent gray hair coverage at the age of 50 years.

While hair loss and graying are considered by

How does poor sleep affect our ability to learn? Study investigates

Most of us know that a good night’s sleep is key for happiness and productivity, and that conversely, a night of poor sleep can have negative effects on our performance during the day. But a new study manages to find precisely the brain area responsible for learning new skills and shows how it can be affected by poor sleep quality.

A team of researchers from the University of Zurich (UZH) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, both in Switzerland, set out to examine the effect of a disturbed deep sleep phase on the brain’s ability to learn new things.

More specifically, the new study – published in the journal Nature Communications – looks at the brain’s ability to change and adapt in response to the stimuli that it receives from the environment, or neuroplasticity, in the motor cortex and how it is affected by deep sleep.

The motor cortex is the brain area responsible for developing and controlling motor skills, and the deep sleep phase – also called slow-wave sleep – is key for memory formation and processing, as well as for helping the brain to restore itself after a day of activity.

Vegetables improve psychological health in just 2 weeks

Fruits and vegetables are a pivotal part of a healthful diet, but their benefits are not limited to physical health. New research finds that increasing fruit and vegetable consumption may improve psychological well-being in as little as 2 weeks.

Study leader Dr. Tamlin Conner, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Otago in New Zealand, and colleagues found that young adults who were given extra fruits and vegetables each day for 14 days ate more of the produce and experienced a boost in motivation and vitality.

The researchers recently reported their findings in the journal PLOS One.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, adults should aim to consume around two cups of fruits and around two to three cups of vegetables daily.

One cup of fruits is the equivalent to half a grapefruit or a large orange, and one cup of vegetables is proportionate to one large red pepper or a large, baked sweet potato.

As part of a healthful diet, fruits and vegetables can help reduce the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancer.

In recent years, studies have suggested that fruit and vegetable intake may also improve mental health. For their study,

Marijuana’s popularity in the US is on the rise

Marijuana’s popularity among American adults is on the rise — and use of the recreational drug is expected to continue to increase, according to several surveys.

The increase in popularity, along with more permissive attitudes toward marijuana use, may be due in part to its changing legalization status in many parts of the country, experts say.

Forty-five percent of adults in the U.S. have used marijuana at least once in their lives, according to a Gallup poll released in mid-July — the all-time highest percentage in the 48-year history of Gallup asking Americans this question. [25 Odd Facts About Marijuana]

Trying marijuana at least once as an adult isn’t the same as being a user of the drug, but the percentage of current smokers is on the rise as well: The same Gallup poll revealed that 12 percent of U.S. adults — 1 in 8 — said they use marijuana, up from 7 percent in 2013.

Meanwhile, data from two large national surveys done by the federal government also finds increasing rates of marijuana use among adults. (Gallup does its poll by telephone interviews, while federal surveys conduct face-to-face interviews. An in-person interview could possibly influence results because marijuana is

Does Talcum Powder Cause Ovarian Cancer?

Some people may sprinkle on powder after showering and never think much of it. But recent court cases have shined a spotlight on the possible link between women’s regular use of talcum powder on their genitals and an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Yesterday (Aug. 21), a jury in Los Angeles ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a record $417 million to a woman who claims that the company’s baby powder led to her ovarian cancer. The woman, Eva Echeverria, said in the lawsuit that she developed ovarian cancer as a “proximate result of the unreasonably dangerous and defective nature of talcum powder,” according to the Associated Press. (Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder is made from talcum powder or talc, which is a mineral made up of magnesium, silicon and oxygen.)

In a case that was settled in February, a jury determined that the family of a 62-year-old Alabama woman, who died from ovarian cancer in 2015 after decades of using talcum powder for feminine hygiene, was entitled to $72 million in damages from Johnson & Johnson. The company did not inform customers of the potential dangers of its powders despite being aware of the possible health risks,

Eclipse Watchers’ Plane Crashes on Return Trip

A small plane carrying four people who were returning from an eclipse-watching trip crashed just short of an airport in northern California.

No one was hurt in the crash, which occurred Monday evening (Aug. 21) about a mile short of an airport in Byron, California (a town about 60 miles, or 96 kilometers, east of San Francisco), according to The Mercury News.

The pilot and three passengers were returning to the Bay Area after viewing the solar eclipse in Oregon on Monday, The Mercury News said.

The plane began to experience problems on the return trip; the pilot tried to make an emergency landing at the airport, but the plane landed in an irrigation pond close to the airport.

Officials are still investigating the cause of the crash, but it may have been a fuel shortage on the plane.

Small planes were popular vehicles for traveling to watch Monday’s solar eclipse. An airport in Madras, Oregon — a hotspot for watching the eclipse — typically gets three flights arriving per hour. But in the days leading up to the eclipse, the airport was getting one flight arriving every 3 minutes, according to CBS News. On Saturday,

I Used Solar Eclipse Glasses, So Why Do My Eyes Feel Funny?

After viewing the historic solar eclipse yesterday (Aug. 21), some watchers reported that their eyes felt funny, even though they wore certified eclipse glasses. But what might have caused this, and should you be concerned if it happened to you?

Experts say that if your eyes felt a little strange after the eclipse, it’s not necessarily a reason to worry. That’s because this funny feeling is not a sign of “solar retinopathy,” or damage to the eye’s retina that can occur from looking at the sun.

“The retina has no sensory nerve fibers,” so you can’t feel damage to this part of your eye, said Dr. Vincent Jerome Giovinazzo, the director of ophthalmology at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. “If your eyes feel funny, it’s going to be [a feeling] on the surface.” [Photos: 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse]

Giovinazzo said he has already seen several patients who told him that their eyes felt funny after watching yesterday’s eclipse. In every case, the patient actually had dryness on their eyes’ outer surface from holding their eyes open too long — a condition known as exposure keratitis, Giovinazzo said.

Dr. Nathan Podoll, a spokesperson for the

Depression: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Depression, or major depressive disorder, is a mental health condition marked by an overwhelming feeling of sadness, isolation and despair that affects how a person thinks, feels and functions. The condition may significantly interfere with a person’s daily life and may prompt thoughts of suicide. Depression isn’t the same as sadness, loneliness or grief caused by a challenging life experience, such as the death of a loved one.

In 2015, an estimated 16.1 million U.S. adults (aged 18 or older), or 6.7 percent of the adult population, had at least one major depressive episode, or experienced depressive symptoms, in the past year, making this condition one of the most common mental disorders in the United States, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

Depression can affect people of all ages, races and socioeconomic classes, and can strike at any time. The condition is found in twice as many women as men, according to the NIMH.

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In a recently published report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found that women between 40 and 59 have the highest rate of depression (12.3 percent) of any group based on age

How to Protect Yourself from Cold and Flu in 2017

In 2017, Live Science is bringing our readers a monthly series on personal health goals. We’ll give you tips and tricks for reaching those goals, based on the advice we’ve gathered from the countless health experts we’ve interviewed. Each month, we’ll focus on a different goal, and the goal for September is “avoiding colds and flu.” Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to connect with other readers who are working toward these goals.

When the weather starts to cool down and you feel a nip in the air, it means that cold and flu season are just around the corner. Although there is no sure-fire way to avoid catching a cold or the flu, there are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of these illnesses this fall and winter. On this page, we’ve rounded up the most important information from Live Science on how to help prevent cold and flu, and what to do if you get sick.

Cold and flu infections both cause similar symptoms, and they are both more common in the winter months compared to other times of the year. But these illnesses have

Sleep Deprived Sleepers May Be High Risk of Dementia

Consider it another strike against not getting enough sleep: A new study finds that getting too little REM sleep may be linked to a higher risk of dementia later in life.

REM, or “rapid eye movement,” sleep is one of four sleep stages, which also include two stages of light sleep and a stage of deeper sleep called slow-wave sleep. REM sleep is characterized by vivid dreams and high levels of brain activity, similar to the brain’s state when its awake. Humans typically cycle through several periods of REM sleep between the other stages of sleep each night.

In the new study, published today (Aug. 23) in the journal Neurology, researchers found that the people who developed dementia had gotten significantly less REM sleep when examined overnight years earlier compared with the people who didn’t develop cognitive problems. [Get Better Sleep in 2017]

The study does not prove that low levels of REM sleep cause dementia; rather, it shows an association between the two, said lead study author Matthew Pase, a senior research fellow at Swinburne University of Technology in Australia.

Pase offered several ideas for how REM sleep and dementia might be linked.

“On one

How Stress in Your Brain Could Lead to Stress in Your Body

The patterns in your brain may predict how your body physically reacts to stressful situations, a new study finds.

That’s important, because some people have stronger physical reactions to stress than others: Their hearts beat faster, and their blood pressure rises more, than you’d see in less “reactive” individuals, according to the study. And this “exaggerated” stress response can have negative consequences in the long run. [10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Brain]

People whose blood pressure shoots up in stressful situations are more likely to develop high blood pressure in the future, and they may also have an increased risk of death from heart disease, according to the study, published today (Aug. 23) in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“It’s the people who show the largest stress-related cardiovascular response who are at the greatest risk for poor cardiovascular health, and understanding the brain mechanisms for this may help to reduce their risk,” senior study author Peter Gianaros, a professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh, said in a statement.

To study this “brain-body” relationship, the researchers performed brain scans on more than 300 adults while also monitoring their physical responses, such as